goodbye

So after Thursday and Friday I was forced to say goodbye to all of the people I gotten to know, in each of the respective projects. Though on Friday I may have been more forced than Thursday as a co worker would not let me leave until I said goodbye to the team. I made some good memories and friends. They even said I could come back any week after I done working at my summer job. I might end up taking them up on that offer.

giving away prizes to gain viewers

Something I only just started thinking about is how the shows I help work on for the internship all give away prizes that were given to them by sponsors. This way practically everyone wins. The winner gets some free stuff. The show gets some more viewers. and the sponsor gets some free advertisements. As long as the show does not gain sponsors that are not responsible, it seems like there is no down side to this besides losing a couple of minutes of air time to talk about the prizes. But then again that might be the part that people are the most excited about if they do not care about the show and only about the prizes. I guess what I am trying to say is how I don’t know why more shows do stuff like this.

panic behind the scenes

Something I did not expect about the production industry is how much panic goes on behind the scene. When in the middle of a show we learn there is an issue with a tool we are using. Or when everyone has too quickly create a bit before a scene transition. Or just you need to tell someone something in the brief time in between when they are on camera. All these things create panic on the set and all of that has to be expelled as soon as people are back on camera to pretend like everything is going as intended. It is really interesting all the forcing a mood in what seems like a very improvisational show

watching the processes

luckily I have not been assigned to do to much work for my internship just yet. Unless you count Mondays. So instead I have been observing what everyone else has been doing. This might have been for the better because now I can better see how professionals react to the questions I may have.

strange meeting

So this Tuesday I learned that Michael Prado apparently watches the TauntFest occasionally. One time when I got on he recognized me and called out to me in the live chat. I think this was both a shock to me and him. I emailed him right afterwords. I do not really know how this ties into my essential question but I feel like this would make an interesting enough blog post.

being a part of the shows

Something that was interesting about this week compared to last week is that I became much more involved with the show, because the hosts invited me to participate for parts of it. It still follows my essential question because I was mostly used as a way to fill dead air. About 2 times per show (which usually last about 3 hours) the host will invite me on and ask me a couple of questions. This is usually done when something else in the background has to be worked out and they need to stall for time. This has led to me being a lot more involved and invested in the show.

Dragons and Stuff

The last show I help with is a dungeons and dragons show called Dragons and Stuff. This show I found very interesting because they have to do on demand special effects and quickly two. For example, if one of the players says they are going to swing a club, one of the tech people has to pull up the animation for a club swinging almost imminently. Also the tech people have so many buttons and cameras they have to be keeping track of. For example, if someone is going to roll some dice the tech person has to quickly press the button that switches to the dice camera for that specific person before they actually end up rolling the die. All while still getting the special effects ready to play for whatever they are doing. The tech person at the end of the show made a joke that I felt made quite a lot of sense. “It is a job that only an octopus can do properly.” If the tech director is too slow then it could leave the audience with much less information then they should have to watch the show.

Tauntfest

another show I help out with is a show called Tauntfest. This one I am less involved in but still have been keeping note of some interesting thing they do to reduce delays while live. They always have someone doing something. For example, while the most recent player is being interviewed, another person will be actively looking up the winner of a prize so when the interview is over they can imminently say who won the prize and ask them what the winner wants. This I find really interesting because it seems to require a lot of unblinking attention for most people who are involved. If someone spaces out for even a moment, it could lead to huge delays where nothing is really happening on the stream.

Game Talk Live

Something I learned about removing delays in production is having a good amount of information available to the speakers. In Game Talk Live I have two main jobs. The first job is helping with the resurrect and adding it to the power point that the speakers read on their computers. It is very interesting what info is good to put on this power point. For example, you have to make sure that the information is vague yet important. It has to be something that it is one of the more important parts of a news story yet also make it so the speakers can naturally integrate that into any conversation they may be having. The other job I have is to look things up live and then tell the information to someone who can write it down on a place the speakers can read. This is hard because I need to make sure I can do it fast enough that it leads to very little delay and dead air.